Ballot Issue

Author: Mike Rosen

With their majority in both houses of the state legislature and the office of governor, Democrats exploited their monopoly on state government to ram through a measure that commits Colorado to a nationwide plot to subvert presidential elections. It’s called the National Popular Vote (NPV) Compact.

It’s a devious scheme to circumvent the Electoral College which was brilliantly crafted by our founders to conform with the constitutional republic they created, as codified in Article IV, Section 4 guaranteeing to every state a “republican form of government.” And decidedly not a direct democracy. The word “democracy” appears nowhere in the Constitution or the Declaration of Independence. The notion that we have a national popular vote for president is a fiction. What we have are 51 separate elections, one in each of the states and the District of Columbia. It’s only as a matter of curiosity that we tally the votes of those 51 popular elections to produce a national total. But it has no force of law.

The democratic principle of “one person one vote” applies more appropriately to the US House where seats are apportioned strictly by population; but not in the Senate where each state gets two votes regardless of population. Electoral votes for president are also assigned among the states to disproportionally favor states with low populations, and they’re cast winner-take-all (except in Nebraska and Maine) rather than proportionately based on a state’s popular vote. James Madison explained that, “The immediate election of the president is to be made by the states in their political characters.” That is, as individual entities not as members of any collective “compact.”

To read the rest of this story, click (HERE):

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled a ballot initiative to fully repeal the Colorado Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) amendment to the state constitution meets the single-subject requirement for statewide ballot initiatives. The court released its decision Monday, June 17.

The initiative is the latest attempt to remove TABOR from the state constitution. It would completely repeal section 20 of Article X.

The measure to repeal, currently known as Initiative 3, may appear on the ballot in 2020.

Critics of TABOR blame it for shortfalls in funding public education, transportation, and other services.  They also want to end restrictions it places on state and other governmental units.

Supporters of TABOR credit it for restraining the growth of government, imposing discipline on spending, and alleviating any declines in revenue during economic downturns.

Two other initiatives changing Colorado’s taxing authority will appear on the ballot for 2019.

Proposition DD is a measure to legalize and tax sports betting.

Proposition CC would repeal the requirement to return to taxpayers revenue in excess of caps and instead allow the state to retain and spend such revenues.

We urge you to become informed on the issues.  While the full-blown repeal would not appear on the ballot until next year, the elimination of the refund requirement will be voted on this year.

TABOR is more than a requirement taxpayers be given the opportunity to vote on taxes and tax increases.  It directly holds governmental units responsible for policies and programs affecting revenues and expenses. Demand specifics from those wanting to alter TABOR.  What is underfunded?  What will additional revenues be spent on? Make sure those supporting TABOR can answer critics.

Please carefully consider all aspects of this issue. How government taxes and spends is not a bumper sticker.

 

Respectfully,

Reagan Club of Colorado

Michael Fields@MichaelCLFields Tweeted:
The state budget went up by $1.6B again this year. Government has enough money already.
 

Coloradans may face 4 spending questions this year. Will new nicotine tax measure overload the ballot?

The proposal, announced Wednesday by Gov. Jared Polis and Democratic state lawmakers, would set a uniform nicotine tax at 62 percent. That would lift the taxes on a package of cigarettes to $2.49 from 84 cents.

Continue reading

The Reagan Club of Colorado was glad to host Penn Pfiffner at April’s meeting to talk about the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights. TABOR has kept Colorado fiscally healthy, but look for it to come under assault by the Democrats this year. Learn more about the work that The TABOR Foundation and TABOR Committee do at http://thetaborfoundation.org/.

 

Get ready to be engaged and informed with The Reagan Club of Colorado’s 2019 speakers at our monthly meetings.  We meet on the second Thursday of month from 6:00pm-8:30pm at CB & Potts, 1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.

Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  You can pay your 2019 dues at the door or online at: http://www.reaganclubco.com/membership-dues/

Be engaged and informed at our Thursday meeting.  Pinch hitting for our previously announce

d speaker, Patrick Neville, is former state senator Tim Neville.  Tim has graciously 

agreed to fill in for son Patrick who has a business matter to attend to.  Tim has been a welcome guest at Reagan Club before.  We look forward to Tim’s news and analysis. 

 

We know February 14 is on the calendar for other than the Reagan Club meeting — we’ll be marking that, too!

See you the 14th.

If you are planning to attend,  Continue reading

Bill to link Colo.’s presidential choice to national vote heading to Senate floor

  • Jan 24, 2019

JakeOlimb / iStock

A bill that would pledge all of Colorado’s nine electoral votes in presidential elections to the candidate who wins the national popular vote passed a state Senate committee Wednesday, sending it to the Senate floor for a vote.

Scores of professors, activists, lobbyists, and citizens filled the committee’s room, the nearby hallway, and a spillover room to hear the debate. Among them: newly elected Secretary of State Jena Griswold.

The bill is a partisan issue, some say, a rebuke of Donald Trump’s election in 2016. And many warned of unintended consequences, deepening fractures in an already-divided country. Continue reading

Effort launched to repeal Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights; possible ballot issue before the Title Board

The Title Board is the first step in putting a citizen-initiated question before voters.

TABOR is a constitutional amendment that was passed by voters in 1992 that requires voter approval to increase taxes or take on new debt.  It also limits the growth of a portion of the state budget to a formula of population growth plus inflation. It has been a controversial topic since its inception, and it’s been debated in the courts numerous times.

Many Democrats say it is a threat to Colorado’s education, transportation and health care funding, while Republicans counter that it is what has allowed the Colorado economy to prosper, as well as allowing Colorado to more easily weather economic downturns than states that lack taxpayer protections such as TABOR.

Many attempts to repeal or tweak portions of the amendment have come before the Title Board. This is the first time, however, that anyone can recall where a full repeal of the amendment has been proposed.

Continue reading

In 2019, the Reagan Club of Colorado is moving our monthly meetings to the second Thursday of each month to inform and engage you from 6:00pm-8:30pm.  We’ve moved our meeting location back to CB & Potts (1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234).  Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.  Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  Below is our tentative calendar:

Mar 14:  Steve House, former Colorado State GOP Chair

Apr 11:

May 9:

Jun 13:

Jul 11:

Aug 8:

Sept 12:

Oct 10:

Nov 14:

Dec 12:

Admin’s note: Vote NO on 73. It’s not “for the kids” as supporters of this TAX INCREASE say. This ballot question is a liberals spending dream and an end run around TABOR. Education already gets a funding increase every year since Amendment 23 passed in 2000. It’s too bad that student’s achievement results didn’t rise. More money does not equal better outcomes. TABOR will survive this misguided attempt.

Ballot initiative seeks to increase taxes by $1.6 billion; could end Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights

A controversial ballot initiative would raise taxes on Coloradans by $1.6 billion to increase funding for public schools if approved. Opponents argue it also would make the constitutionally protected Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) impotent.

Amendment 73, the Establish Income Tax Brackets and Raise Taxes for Education Initiative, seeks to amend the state constitution to replace Colorado’s flat rate income tax with a progressive income tax. Individuals earning more than $150,000 would be taxed more and the corporate income tax rate would increase. The revenue collected from the tax hikes would go into a newly created Quality Public Education Fund.

The state constitution requires a 55 percent supermajority vote for the initiative to become law.

“‘Take your success elsewhere’ should be the signs erected if Colorado approves Amendment 73,” Penn Pfiffner, former state legislator and chairman of the board of the TABOR Foundation, told Watchdog.org. “The Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights properly treats everyone equally, requiring the same income tax rate be applied to everyone. Currently, if you make more money, you pay more, but only at the rate that everyone else pays. This proposal would change that, bringing an attitude that the upper middle class and wealthy should be attacked and made to pay increasing amounts. It is the worst concept in raising taxes.”

A group of opponents of the measure launched a “Blank Check. Blatant Deception. Vote No on 73,” campaign, arguing the ballot language is deceptive. It tried to have the question removed after the required deadline and Colorado’s secretary of state rejected its complaint. Continue reading

The Reagan Club meets on the second Thursday of every month at CB & Potts, 1257 W 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234 from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. with doors open at 6:00 p.m. Enter via CB & Potts main entrance and head to the back meeting room. Food and beverages are available from CB & Potts. We feature different programs and speakers as we honor the 40th President. The Reagan Club of Colorado seeks to promote the Constitution, smaller government, lower taxes, personal freedom, helping candidates, and educating the public about one of our greatest presidents, Ronald Wilson Reagan.

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