Climate Change

By RICH LOWRY

President Ronald Reagan in 1982 (National Archives)

‘A Time for Choosing’ is a brilliant libertarian speech. But Reagan couldn’t have foreseen the toxic individualism that challenges us today.The greatest documents in American history never lose their ability to astonish. They deserve, and repay, careful study, and inevitably have contemporary resonances no matter how long ago they were written or uttered.

There’s no doubt that Ronald Reagan’s “A Time for Choosing” belongs in the top ranks of American speeches. It is among the most significant political speeches ever given by a non- officeholder and non-presidential candidate. It heralded the beginning of the political career of a man who would go on to be a successful two-term president, and it remains an extraordinarily powerful and cogent expression of a deeply held worldview.

The speech is a defining statement of modern conservatism. Reagan’s core arguments in the speech about the deleterious effects of taxes, deficit spending, and debt defined the Republican agenda for two generations.

He gave us phrases still quoted fondly by conservatives, including “the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn’t so,” and “a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we’ll ever see on this earth.”

To read the rest of this article, please click (HERE):

The Left’s Lucrative Nonprofits

‘Powerful interests’ and ‘dark money’ are mostly on the Democratic side.

By Kimberley A. Strassel

Sept. 5, 2019 6:49 pm ET

The Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Mo., May 30.PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

This year’s Democratic presidential candidates have a favorite whipping boy: “powerful interests.” Get ready to hear again in coming weeks how the National Rifle Association rules Washington, how the Koch empire dominates politics, how the right is pouring “dark money” into its agenda. And then remember that these are among the biggest whoppers of the 2020 election. One side will do battle with the aid of a huge and savvy nonprofit political empire—and it isn’t the right. Though the sooner Republicans understand that, the better.

A helpful tutorial arrived this week, “Power Grab,” a new book by Republican former Rep. Jason Chaffetz of Utah. Mr. Chaffetz has been digging into nonprofits since his time as House Oversight Committee chairman, and the book details how powerful the liberal nonprofit sector has grown. It may surprise many Americans—those who read daily stories about conservative “influence”—that the likes of the NRA, Judicial Watch and the National Organization for Marriage barely rank by comparison to the assets and revenue of Planned Parenthood, the American Civil Liberties Union or the Nature Conservancy.

These aren’t only big political players; they’re the biggest political players. In 2018 the nonprofit watchdog Capital Research Center analyzed grants handed out in the 2014 election year by six big foundations on the right (including the Bradley and Charles Koch foundations) versus six on the left (including the Open Society and Tides foundations). Liberal public-policy charities, organized under chapter 501(c)(3) of the tax code, bagged $7.4 billion of this foundation money in 2014. For conservative charities, the figure was a mere $2.2 billion. That $7.4 billion also dwarfed total 2013-14 campaign receipts to federal, state and local campaigns ($4.1 billion) and spending that cycle by independent groups ($830 million).

Mr. Chaffetz’s contribution is to refocus attention on the way liberal charities channel their huge funds into political work that benefits the Democratic Party. We’ve long known that some of them engage in nominally nonpartisan voter registration, conveniently only in places likely to yield Democratic votes. The Chaffetz book adds new data highlighting contracts between liberal charities and overt political organizations.

To read the rest of this story, click (HERE):

 

Join the Reagan Club on March 14 to hear Steve House at the Reagan Club meeting at CB & Potts (1257 W 120th Ave, Westminster). Steve will be speaking on a number of topics ranging from where the party has been to what we might see with the upcoming organization meetings. We also look forward to hearing about his experiences in Kenya as part of a medical mission.
Check-in and networking begins at 6:00pm with Steve speaking after announcements at 7pm
Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members & $10 for non-members. You can also pay your 2019 dues. There is food and drink available for purchase from CB & Potts menu.

 

Boulder lawmakers have introduced Senate Bill 19-181, anti-oil and gas legislation that could have devastating impacts for over 100,000 hard-working families in our industry. The bill sponsors failed to hold a legitimate stakeholder process, never showed industry trades the bill, mislead Coloradans about how our rules haven’t been updated in 60 years, and are holding the first hearing just one business day after the bill was introduced.

The bill will be heard in the Senate Transportation & Energy Committee at 2:00 PM on Tuesday, March 5th in Senate Committee Room 357 (third floor of Capitol).

The time to stand up for your job is NOW. Legislators need to hear our voices and see our faces. We can make a difference, but it will take all of us. Please take action using the steps below and share with friends and colleagues!

  1. Rally to protect our jobs. We are calling all members of industry to gather at the State Capitol at 12:00 PM on Tuesday before the committee hearing. Share the flyer and Facebook event with friends and colleagues.
  2. Testify in opposition to the bill. After the rally, industry members need to go inside the Capitol to testify in opposition to the bill. Legislators must hear your personal, passionate energy story. Check out these tips for testifying in a legislative committee hearing. Need to brush up on your facts? COGA’s fact sheets can help!
  3. Contact senators on the committee. Email and call the senators listed below, starting with the Democrats on the committee. Ask them to protect your job in this industry that is critical to Colorado’s economy.

Sen. Faith Winter (D-Adams) Committee Chair

  • faith.winter.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-4863

Sen. Brittany Pettersen (D-Jefferson) Committee Vice Chair

  • brittany.pettersen.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-4859

Sen. Kerry Donovan (D-Eagle)

  • kerry.donovan.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-4871

Sen. Mike Foote (D-Boulder)

  • mike.foote.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-5291

Sen. Dennis Hisey (R-El Paso)

  • dennis.hisey.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-4877

Sen. Kevin Priola (R-Adams)

  • kpriola@gmail.com
  • 303-866-4855

Sen. Ray Scott (R-Mesa)

  • ray.scott.senate@state.co.us
  • 303-866-3077

Who’s Deplorable Now?

Democrats wonder if they still need the Midwest.

By James Freeman
Feb. 25, 2019 5:08 p.m. ET

Election night at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016. PHOTO: SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES

It must be exhausting these days serving as a Democratic political operative. The party remains in a seemingly endless debate over how much to favor some demographic groups of American voters—and how much to punish others.

At one point there seemed to be a Democratic consensus that the party’s disappointing performance in 2016 had a lot to do with ignoring or deploring blue-collar voters in the Midwest. And at least some of the party’s current and potential 2020 presidential candidates still hold this view.

This week in the New York Times, Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns report from Iowa:
With polls indicating that electoral viability is as important to voters as any policy issue, a handful of the party’s prospects are already holding up their Midwestern credentials to make the case that they are the ones who can turn Big 10 country — Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin — blue again.

But the Timesmen add: Continue reading

Get ready to be engaged and informed with The Reagan Club of Colorado’s 2019 speakers at our monthly meetings.  We meet on the second Thursday of month from 6:00pm-8:30pm at CB & Potts, 1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.

Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  You can pay your 2019 dues at the door or online at: http://www.reaganclubco.com/membership-dues/

Be engaged and informed at our Thursday meeting.  Pinch hitting for our previously announce

d speaker, Patrick Neville, is former state senator Tim Neville.  Tim has graciously 

agreed to fill in for son Patrick who has a business matter to attend to.  Tim has been a welcome guest at Reagan Club before.  We look forward to Tim’s news and analysis. 

 

We know February 14 is on the calendar for other than the Reagan Club meeting — we’ll be marking that, too!

See you the 14th.

If you are planning to attend,  Continue reading

The Reagan Club meets on the second Thursday of every month at CB & Potts, 1257 W 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234 from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. with doors open at 6:00 p.m. Enter via CB & Potts main entrance and head to the back meeting room. Food and beverages are available from CB & Potts. We feature different programs and speakers as we honor the 40th President. The Reagan Club of Colorado seeks to promote the Constitution, smaller government, lower taxes, personal freedom, helping candidates, and educating the public about one of our greatest presidents, Ronald Wilson Reagan.

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