Issues

INTERVIEW: Jared Polis on energy, death penalty, TABOR and more

Author: Next with Kyle Clark, 9News – November 9, 2018 –

Colorado Gov.-elect Jared Polis is interviewed Nov. 7 on “Next with Kyle Clark.” (KUSA-9News, Denver)

Shortly after he was elected governor of Colorado, Jared Polis sat down with 9News anchor Kyle Clark to discuss his historic victory and his plans.

During a 10-minute conversation, which aired Nov. 7 on 9News’ “Next with Kyle Clark,” the Democrat weighed in on oil and gas regulation, the death penalty, TABOR and taxes, and on being America’s first openly gay candidate to be elected governor.

Here’s a transcript of Clark’s interview with Polis. And watch the full interview below.

Kyle Clark: Governor Elect Jared Polis, congratulations. Welcome back to “Next.”

Jared Polis: Thank you, Kyle. Pleasure to be here.


Clark:
 Colorado voters gave Democrats sweeping control of state government last night, yet they also rejected two statewide tax increases and rejected increased restrictions on oil and gas drilling. What’s your takeaway from all that together? Continue reading

Admin’s note: Vote NO on 73. It’s not “for the kids” as supporters of this TAX INCREASE say. This ballot question is a liberals spending dream and an end run around TABOR. Education already gets a funding increase every year since Amendment 23 passed in 2000. It’s too bad that student’s achievement results didn’t rise. More money does not equal better outcomes. TABOR will survive this misguided attempt.

Ballot initiative seeks to increase taxes by $1.6 billion; could end Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights

A controversial ballot initiative would raise taxes on Coloradans by $1.6 billion to increase funding for public schools if approved. Opponents argue it also would make the constitutionally protected Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) impotent.

Amendment 73, the Establish Income Tax Brackets and Raise Taxes for Education Initiative, seeks to amend the state constitution to replace Colorado’s flat rate income tax with a progressive income tax. Individuals earning more than $150,000 would be taxed more and the corporate income tax rate would increase. The revenue collected from the tax hikes would go into a newly created Quality Public Education Fund.

The state constitution requires a 55 percent supermajority vote for the initiative to become law.

“‘Take your success elsewhere’ should be the signs erected if Colorado approves Amendment 73,” Penn Pfiffner, former state legislator and chairman of the board of the TABOR Foundation, told Watchdog.org. “The Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights properly treats everyone equally, requiring the same income tax rate be applied to everyone. Currently, if you make more money, you pay more, but only at the rate that everyone else pays. This proposal would change that, bringing an attitude that the upper middle class and wealthy should be attacked and made to pay increasing amounts. It is the worst concept in raising taxes.”

A group of opponents of the measure launched a “Blank Check. Blatant Deception. Vote No on 73,” campaign, arguing the ballot language is deceptive. It tried to have the question removed after the required deadline and Colorado’s secretary of state rejected its complaint. Continue reading

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Who’s Attacking Political Norms Now?

Democrats target the ‘legitimacy’ of the Supreme Court.

Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris at a Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Sept. 28.
Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris at a Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Sept. 28. PHOTO: AARON P. BERNSTEIN/BLOOMBERG NEWS

After the extraordinary tumult of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings ended, three normal things happened that are embedded in this country’s Constitution and traditions.
 
The full Senate voted on the nomination, and Judge Kavanaugh was confirmed. Then Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swore in Mr. Kavanaugh as an Associate Justice. Last Tuesday Justice Kavanaugh, sitting as the most junior Justice next to Justice Elena Kagan, participated in oral arguments in two cases involving the Armed Career Criminal Act.
 
For Democrats, this return to normalcy is intolerable. They are doubling down on their war against the new Justice.
 
They have several related goals: Undermine Justice Kavanaugh’s authority on the Court, argue that his presence undermines the legitimacy of the Supreme Court itself, drive Justice Kavanaugh off the Court through impeachment if they win control of the House of Representatives, and, most fantastic of all, consider expanding the size of the Court if they regain control of the government.
 
At his political rallies, President Trump has taken to calling out “the radical Democrats.” Democrats are appalled at the President’s rhetoric. We can’t imagine why. If the party’s post-confirmation campaign against Justice Kavanaugh isn’t a radical departure from the norms of American politics, we can’t imagine what is.
 
Dianne Feinstein, speaking from her Senatorial platform on Twitter , wrote that Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation “undermines the legitimacy of the Supreme Court.” Possibly Twitter’s character limitations prevented Senator Feinstein from explaining exactly how the legitimacy of the Court was being undermined, but the idea has taken hold among Democrats.

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What if Obama Voters Remember How Lousy the Obama Era Was?

The left worries that young people and minorities don’t hate Trump enough.

By James Freeman

Oct. 12, 2018 5:01 p.m. ET

Former President Barack Obama campaigns for Democratic candidates in Pennsylvania last month. PHOTO: MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

During the Obama administration there was much confident chatter on the left about the “coalition of the ascendant.” This rising population of young people, social liberals and minority voters not only carried Barack Obama to two national victories but was allegedly destined by demography to exert an increasing leftward tug on American politics. The potential problem for leaders of this coalition is that along the way some of their followers may have noticed the results of their policies.

A few warning signs have been appearing lately as the Obama generation makes it way into the workplace and as minority voters seem unwilling to hate President Donald Trump as much as Democratic politicians and the press expect them to do.

“It’s time for some alarm about the midterms,” writes David Leonhardt of the New York Times. “The most recent polls have underscored the real possibility that Republicans will keep control of both the Senate and House.” According to Mr. Leonhardt:

Democrats now appear highly unlikely to take back the Senate, which was always going to be hard for them, given the conservatism of the states holding Senate elections this year. And while Democrats are still favored to win the House, many races remain so close — with neither candidate yet polling above 50 percent — that they could break either way in the final weeks. It’s easy to see a scenario in which many Democratic-leaning voters fail to turn out, as often happens in the midterms, and many Republican-leaning voters remain loyal to the party.

How could turnout possibly be a problem for Democrats, given all of the rage from professional leftists directed at Mr. Trump? Apparently amateur leftists aren’t as angry and in many cases may not even be leftists. Continue reading

Health Care Crowds Out Jobs, Taxes in Midterm Ads

Once mum on health care, Democrats are hammering the issue in political ads as GOP attempts to tout tax cuts and economy

By Brian McGill and Julie Bykowicz

 Eight years ago, the newly passed Affordable Care Act was so widely criticized that it contributed to Democrats losing control of the House of Representatives. But in this midterm election, health care is the party’s most-mentioned topic in advertising—far above anything else, including opposition to President Trump.

Meanwhile, Republicans—who have made repealing the Affordable Care Act one of their top advertising messages since the 2010 election—are barely mentioning it this year, after the GOP-led Congress tried unsuccessfully to overturn the law last year. The party has instead turned its attention to touting the tax legislation Mr. Trump signed into law late last year.

The Wall Street Journal analyzed Kantar Media/CMAG advertising data on health care and tax and economic messaging in all House and Senate races from Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. Here is what campaign ads tell us about how the political conversation is changing.

Health Care

In 2010, about 29% of Republican political ads targeted the ACA while fewer than 6% of the Democrats’ ads did so—and even the Democratic messaging was split between positive and negative messages.

In the 2014 midterms, 44% of Republican ads attacked Obamacare while 31% of Democratic ads mentioned the issue. Continue reading

The Next Kavanaugh Stakes
PHOTO: JEFF MALET/ZUMA PRESS
Anyone who thinks the brawl over Brett Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court ended with his confirmation by the Senate on Saturday might want to listen again to Chuck Schumer’s floor speech. The Minority Leader made clear that Democrats are going to use accuser Christine Blasey Ford as a campaign prop from here to November and beyond.
 
That may have been the Democratic plan all along once they learned of Ms. Ford’s accusation: Hold it for weeks, spring it as close to the election as possible, and if it doesn’t defeat Mr. Kavanaugh then use it to mobilize Democratic turnout. Perhaps that will work, and if it does Democrats will feel their delay-and-destroy strategy was worth it. Republicans should call out this behavior for how Democrats would govern if they take Congress.
 
***
Meantime, Senate Republicans held together and prevented a Supreme Court defeat that would have been a political disaster. Judge—now Justice—Kavanaugh deserves the most credit for refusing to withdraw and fighting for his seat under enormous pressure.
 
By forcefully defending his integrity and repudiating the Democratic strategy, he gave GOP Senators the confidence to stand with him. He would have been defeated had he played it as meekly as his critics now say in retrospect that he should have. Credit to Donald Trump too for standing by his nominee.

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Join the Reagan Club this Thursday, October 4th as Michael Fields will discuss the pros and cons of each ballot initiative on your November 6th Mail-in Ballot.  He will explain the who, what, why, when, and costs of each.  So many questions to vote intelligently but we have the have the answers!

Doors open at 6:00pm with the meeting starting at 6:30pm and dinner served after the prayer and announcements.  We meet at Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton.  Admission is $20 for Reagan Club members and $25 for non-members.  Elected officials and announced candidates are $15.

Save $5 by buying your tickets before October 2nd on our website (www.ReaganClubCo.com/meeting-tickets).

Bring your questions as we’ll find out what is best for Colorado.

See you there!

 

Michael Fields is the Executive Director of Colorado Rising Action. He was previously the State Director of Americans for Prosperity – Colorado. He brings years of educational, legislative, grassroots organizing, and nonprofit experience. He has also served as a policy aide at the Colorado State House and as a press aide for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions. He taught both elementary and middle school at a charter school in Aurora – and now serves as the governing board president of that school. Michael graduated from Valparaiso University and earned his J.D. from University of Colorado – Boulder. He and his wife, Mele, and their three children live in Littleton.–

Michael Fields

Executive Director

Colorado Rising Action

720-218-9478

 

Michael Fields leaves Americans for Prosperity to lead Colorado Rising Action

Author: Joey Bunch – July 30, 2018 – Updated: July 30, 2018

Michael Fields (Photo courtesy of Americans for Prosperity)

Michael Fields is leaving Americans for Prosperity to head up a conservative organization that aims to press Colorado liberals on the issues.

Colorado Rising Action announced Fields as its executive director Monday. The organization is a state-based offshoot of America Rising Squared, which is an offshoot of America Rising, a group known for tracking candidates and opposition research.

The nonprofit is much like the liberal nonprofit ProgressNow Colorado, except for the right.

Colorado Rising Action said in a press release it plans to “advance conservative principles through cutting-edge research, rapid response communications, a nationwide tracking network, and digital platforms.”

Fields, 31, previously was state director for Americans for Prosperity Colorado. Last year he became senior director of issue education nationally for AFP’s foundation.

“Michael has years of experience at all levels of government and brings incredible insight into Colorado politics and policies,” Joe Pounder, America Rising’s founder and president, said in a statement. “Colorado is in danger of its status as a ‘purple state’ turning blue, but Colorado Rising Action has even more talent on the ground now to make sure that liberal politicians and special interest groups answer to Coloradans.”

To be clear, Colorado Rising Action is not affiliated with Colorado Rising, a group seeking to get an initiative on the November ballot to require 2,500-foot setbacks from homes and businesses for oil and gas operations.

Colorado represents the organization’s second foray into state politics, joining Missouri. Colorado, however, becomes the only state with an executive director and a press person, Lindsey Singer, the niece of billionaire investor Paul Singer, who is a major donor to America Rising. Lindsey Singer grew up in Boulder and attended Fairview High School and the University of Colorado Boulder.

They are joined by adviser Matt Connelly, who formerly worked on Republican gubernatorial candidate Walker Stapleton’s campaign. Though he continues to work for Denver-based Clear Creek Strategies, the firm running Stapleton’s campaign, he cannot by law coordinate between the campaign and the nonprofit.

“Colorado is a great place to live and raise a family, and the work I’ve done with AFP and will continue to do with Colorado Rising Action will ensure it stays that way,” Fields said in a statement Monday. “As a new part of the incredible network of conservative organizations in Colorado, we will make sure that Coloradans know what liberal special-interest groups and their politicians are doing, and the impacts they’ll have on our state.”

A former pitcher at Valparaiso University and teacher in Aurora, Fields joined AFP after working as a policy aide for Republicans in the Colorado legislature and for Wyoming Republican Sen. Mike Enzi, as well as working on local, state and federal political campaigns.

ProgressNow Colorado executive director Ian Silverii was amused by his conservative competition, characterizing it as “Regress Later.”

He pivoted to the November election. It’s what political advocacy groups do.

“This Washington, D.C.-based organization is a front group to help Walker Stapleton continue to fall upwards in his so-far disastrous career,” Silverii said in response to Fields’ announcement. “All the out-of-state money in the world can’t cover up the fact that Stapleton is an absentee treasurer, a sloppy campaigner and a vocal Trump supporter who does not deserve the promotion he’s asking Coloradans for.”

Singer responded to Silverii’s take:

“We’re looking at races from the governor’s race, AG race, some congressional, and state house, state Senate and even watching the ballot initiatives and what liberal groups are doing in Colorado It isn’t about one candidate or one race, and we’re going to be around long after the 2018 election season.”

Click (HERE) for the link to see and/or download the 2018 Colorado Blue Book.

 

 

Colorado’s Fracking Fright

Proposition 112 would prohibit almost all new oil and gas production.

A hydraulic fracturing rig is seen in Weld County, Colorado, Feb. 4, 2016.
A hydraulic fracturing rig is seen in Weld County, Colorado, Feb. 4, 2016. PHOTO: MATTHEW STAVER/BLOOMBERG NEWS

California normally gets all the attention on the front lines of environmental activism. Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed a bill to “decarbonize” all electricity production by 2045. But in real-world implications for the rest of the country, Colorado also deserves attention. A measure heading for the fall ballot would shut down nearly all oil and gas production in one of the top energy-producing states.
 
Colorado’s current rules on energy production prohibit oil and gas operations within 500 feet of a home or 1,000 feet of a school or hospital. But an environmental group called Colorado Rising has collected enough signatures for a proposal on the November ballot to expand these buffer zones and effectively create bans in nearly all of the state.
 
Proposition 112 would restrict new energy development within a 2,500-foot radius of any building, playground, amphitheater, park, body of water or “any other additional vulnerable areas designated by the state or local government.” The restrictions rule out 85% of all non-federal land in the state, according to the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission. In the five counties that produce 90% to 95% of Colorado’s oil and gas, 94% of non-federal land would be off-limits. The implications of such a ban would be national. Colorado ranks fifth among the states in production of natural gas and seventh for oil.

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The Reagan Club meets on the first Thursday of every month at The Amazing Grace Community Church ( 541 E 99th Pl, Thornton, CO, 80229) from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. with doors open at 6:00 p.m.. We feature different programs and speakers as we honor the 40th President. The Reagan Club of Colorado seeks to promote the Constitution, smaller government, lower taxes, personal freedom, helping candidates, and educating the public about one of our greatest presidents, Ronald Wilson Reagan.

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