Colorado GOP

Effort launched to repeal Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights; possible ballot issue before the Title Board

The Title Board is the first step in putting a citizen-initiated question before voters.

TABOR is a constitutional amendment that was passed by voters in 1992 that requires voter approval to increase taxes or take on new debt.  It also limits the growth of a portion of the state budget to a formula of population growth plus inflation. It has been a controversial topic since its inception, and it’s been debated in the courts numerous times.

Many Democrats say it is a threat to Colorado’s education, transportation and health care funding, while Republicans counter that it is what has allowed the Colorado economy to prosper, as well as allowing Colorado to more easily weather economic downturns than states that lack taxpayer protections such as TABOR.

Many attempts to repeal or tweak portions of the amendment have come before the Title Board. This is the first time, however, that anyone can recall where a full repeal of the amendment has been proposed.

Continue reading

Get ready to be engaged and informed with The Reagan Club of Colorado’s 2019 speakers at our monthly meetings.  We meet on the second Thursday of month from 6:00pm-8:30pm at CB & Potts, 1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234.  Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.

Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  You can pay your 2019 dues at the door or online at: http://www.reaganclubco.com/membership-dues/

Our January 10th speaker will be George Brauchler, the 18th Judicial District Attorney in Arapahoe County.

His highest profile case was prosecuting James Holmes, the 2012 Aurora theatre shooter who killed 12 people during the midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises.”  A Colorado judge formally sentences Holmes to 12 life sentences, one life term for each person he killed, plus 3,318 years in prison for the attempted murders of those he wounded and for rigging his apartment with explosives. He is not eligible for parole.

George Brauchler ran for Colorado Attorney General but lost to Phil Weiser in November, 2018.  He will be discussing what happened during the election and where do we go from there.  You don’t want to miss our 2019 kick-off meeting and there will be time for Q&A.

Food and beverages are not included with your admission but available for purchase. CB & Potts Westminster’s menu can be viewed at  https://www.cbpotts.com/locations/westminster.php

  • 6:00pm Doors open, networking, food & drink orders
  • 6:30pm Pledge, Prayer, welcome, & announcements
  • 7:00pm Featured speaker followed by Q&A
  • 8:15-8:30pm Closing remarks

You can find out more up-to-date details at http://www.reaganclubco.com/  and on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ReaganClub

 

In 2019, the Reagan Club of Colorado is moving our monthly meetings to the second Thursday of each month to inform and engage you from 6:00pm-8:30pm.  We’ve moved our meeting location back to CB & Potts (1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234).  Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.  Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  Below is our tentative calendar.

Jan 10:  George Brauchler, 18th Judicial District Attorney for Arapahoe County

Feb 14:  Stan Martin, former Adams County Clerk & Recorder

Mar 14:  Steve House, former Colorado State GOP Chair

Apr 11:

May 9:

Jun 13:

Jul 11:

Aug 8:

Sept 12:

Oct 10:

Nov 14:

Dec 12:

Monday, December 17, 2018

It’s time for the Colorado GOP to regroup and move forward; here’s a four-point plan

  • Sherrie Gibson

As the dust settles and hordes of strategists offer their opinions about where the Republican Party needs to go from election night forward, here is a decidedly different viewpoint.

Many proposed solutions have been bandied about, from dumping Trump to trying to connect to the broader electorate through more compassionate messaging.

Welcome to 2018.

The need for the GOP to look at their messaging has been a recommendation for years, so it is more than amusing to see some folks trip over their own insouciant behavior to breathlessly espouse the benefits of connecting with the heart of the electorate. What has been lacking is the will to believe that messaging is an area in which anyone other than the candidates should be participating.

Then there’s the president; to dump President Trump would be an error. Turning our back on the nomination of two conservative Supreme Court Justices and the reams of regulation already repealed would be a critical mistake, one the base would surely make any Republican candidate pay dearly for. There is an appropriate way to be supportive of the president, and that is to stand on the policies that are positively impacting the lives of every Coloradan.

Republicans need to take an all-of-the-above approach and do these four things:

1) Rebuild the infrastructure. Give disaffected voters a reason to come back and inspire a vision for the future. Voters will not buy into the negative proclamations of rabid government overreach. Continue reading

Admin’s note: Vote NO on 73. It’s not “for the kids” as supporters of this TAX INCREASE say. This ballot question is a liberals spending dream and an end run around TABOR. Education already gets a funding increase every year since Amendment 23 passed in 2000. It’s too bad that student’s achievement results didn’t rise. More money does not equal better outcomes. TABOR will survive this misguided attempt.

Ballot initiative seeks to increase taxes by $1.6 billion; could end Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights

A controversial ballot initiative would raise taxes on Coloradans by $1.6 billion to increase funding for public schools if approved. Opponents argue it also would make the constitutionally protected Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR) impotent.

Amendment 73, the Establish Income Tax Brackets and Raise Taxes for Education Initiative, seeks to amend the state constitution to replace Colorado’s flat rate income tax with a progressive income tax. Individuals earning more than $150,000 would be taxed more and the corporate income tax rate would increase. The revenue collected from the tax hikes would go into a newly created Quality Public Education Fund.

The state constitution requires a 55 percent supermajority vote for the initiative to become law.

“‘Take your success elsewhere’ should be the signs erected if Colorado approves Amendment 73,” Penn Pfiffner, former state legislator and chairman of the board of the TABOR Foundation, told Watchdog.org. “The Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights properly treats everyone equally, requiring the same income tax rate be applied to everyone. Currently, if you make more money, you pay more, but only at the rate that everyone else pays. This proposal would change that, bringing an attitude that the upper middle class and wealthy should be attacked and made to pay increasing amounts. It is the worst concept in raising taxes.”

A group of opponents of the measure launched a “Blank Check. Blatant Deception. Vote No on 73,” campaign, arguing the ballot language is deceptive. It tried to have the question removed after the required deadline and Colorado’s secretary of state rejected its complaint. Continue reading

  • Who:          Adams County Republicans along with Reagan Club members
  • What:         Election night gathering with Hors D’ Oeuvres, coffee/tea/non-alcoholic lemonade and a cash bar
  • Where:       Wedgewood at Brittany Hill, 9350 Grant St, Thornton, CO 80229
  • When:        Tuesday, November 6th (election day evening) from 7:00pm – 10:30pm
  • Why:          Join fellow Republicans to celebrate election numbers for the local, state, and federal contests
  • Suggested donation:  $20
  • With early registration, you can pay $18 per person with a debit/credit card online at http://www.reaganclubco.com/election-night-party/ or $20 per person at the door with cash or check

Please send an email to RSVP@ReaganClubCo.com with how many people will be attending so we don’t run out of food

 

See you there!

The Reagan Club of Colorado

 

 

 

 

Continue reading

Health Care Crowds Out Jobs, Taxes in Midterm Ads

Once mum on health care, Democrats are hammering the issue in political ads as GOP attempts to tout tax cuts and economy

By Brian McGill and Julie Bykowicz

 Eight years ago, the newly passed Affordable Care Act was so widely criticized that it contributed to Democrats losing control of the House of Representatives. But in this midterm election, health care is the party’s most-mentioned topic in advertising—far above anything else, including opposition to President Trump.

Meanwhile, Republicans—who have made repealing the Affordable Care Act one of their top advertising messages since the 2010 election—are barely mentioning it this year, after the GOP-led Congress tried unsuccessfully to overturn the law last year. The party has instead turned its attention to touting the tax legislation Mr. Trump signed into law late last year.

The Wall Street Journal analyzed Kantar Media/CMAG advertising data on health care and tax and economic messaging in all House and Senate races from Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. Here is what campaign ads tell us about how the political conversation is changing.

Health Care

In 2010, about 29% of Republican political ads targeted the ACA while fewer than 6% of the Democrats’ ads did so—and even the Democratic messaging was split between positive and negative messages.

In the 2014 midterms, 44% of Republican ads attacked Obamacare while 31% of Democratic ads mentioned the issue. Continue reading

The Next Kavanaugh Stakes
PHOTO: JEFF MALET/ZUMA PRESS
Anyone who thinks the brawl over Brett Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court ended with his confirmation by the Senate on Saturday might want to listen again to Chuck Schumer’s floor speech. The Minority Leader made clear that Democrats are going to use accuser Christine Blasey Ford as a campaign prop from here to November and beyond.
 
That may have been the Democratic plan all along once they learned of Ms. Ford’s accusation: Hold it for weeks, spring it as close to the election as possible, and if it doesn’t defeat Mr. Kavanaugh then use it to mobilize Democratic turnout. Perhaps that will work, and if it does Democrats will feel their delay-and-destroy strategy was worth it. Republicans should call out this behavior for how Democrats would govern if they take Congress.
 
***
Meantime, Senate Republicans held together and prevented a Supreme Court defeat that would have been a political disaster. Judge—now Justice—Kavanaugh deserves the most credit for refusing to withdraw and fighting for his seat under enormous pressure.
 
By forcefully defending his integrity and repudiating the Democratic strategy, he gave GOP Senators the confidence to stand with him. He would have been defeated had he played it as meekly as his critics now say in retrospect that he should have. Credit to Donald Trump too for standing by his nominee.

Continue reading

Join the Reagan Club this Thursday, October 4th as Michael Fields will discuss the pros and cons of each ballot initiative on your November 6th Mail-in Ballot.  He will explain the who, what, why, when, and costs of each.  So many questions to vote intelligently but we have the have the answers!

Doors open at 6:00pm with the meeting starting at 6:30pm and dinner served after the prayer and announcements.  We meet at Amazing Grace Community Church, 541 E 99th Place in Thornton.  Admission is $20 for Reagan Club members and $25 for non-members.  Elected officials and announced candidates are $15.

Save $5 by buying your tickets before October 2nd on our website (www.ReaganClubCo.com/meeting-tickets).

Bring your questions as we’ll find out what is best for Colorado.

See you there!

 

Michael Fields is the Executive Director of Colorado Rising Action. He was previously the State Director of Americans for Prosperity – Colorado. He brings years of educational, legislative, grassroots organizing, and nonprofit experience. He has also served as a policy aide at the Colorado State House and as a press aide for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions. He taught both elementary and middle school at a charter school in Aurora – and now serves as the governing board president of that school. Michael graduated from Valparaiso University and earned his J.D. from University of Colorado – Boulder. He and his wife, Mele, and their three children live in Littleton.–

Michael Fields

Executive Director

Colorado Rising Action

720-218-9478

 

Michael Fields leaves Americans for Prosperity to lead Colorado Rising Action

Author: Joey Bunch – July 30, 2018 – Updated: July 30, 2018

Michael Fields (Photo courtesy of Americans for Prosperity)

Michael Fields is leaving Americans for Prosperity to head up a conservative organization that aims to press Colorado liberals on the issues.

Colorado Rising Action announced Fields as its executive director Monday. The organization is a state-based offshoot of America Rising Squared, which is an offshoot of America Rising, a group known for tracking candidates and opposition research.

The nonprofit is much like the liberal nonprofit ProgressNow Colorado, except for the right.

Colorado Rising Action said in a press release it plans to “advance conservative principles through cutting-edge research, rapid response communications, a nationwide tracking network, and digital platforms.”

Fields, 31, previously was state director for Americans for Prosperity Colorado. Last year he became senior director of issue education nationally for AFP’s foundation.

“Michael has years of experience at all levels of government and brings incredible insight into Colorado politics and policies,” Joe Pounder, America Rising’s founder and president, said in a statement. “Colorado is in danger of its status as a ‘purple state’ turning blue, but Colorado Rising Action has even more talent on the ground now to make sure that liberal politicians and special interest groups answer to Coloradans.”

To be clear, Colorado Rising Action is not affiliated with Colorado Rising, a group seeking to get an initiative on the November ballot to require 2,500-foot setbacks from homes and businesses for oil and gas operations.

Colorado represents the organization’s second foray into state politics, joining Missouri. Colorado, however, becomes the only state with an executive director and a press person, Lindsey Singer, the niece of billionaire investor Paul Singer, who is a major donor to America Rising. Lindsey Singer grew up in Boulder and attended Fairview High School and the University of Colorado Boulder.

They are joined by adviser Matt Connelly, who formerly worked on Republican gubernatorial candidate Walker Stapleton’s campaign. Though he continues to work for Denver-based Clear Creek Strategies, the firm running Stapleton’s campaign, he cannot by law coordinate between the campaign and the nonprofit.

“Colorado is a great place to live and raise a family, and the work I’ve done with AFP and will continue to do with Colorado Rising Action will ensure it stays that way,” Fields said in a statement Monday. “As a new part of the incredible network of conservative organizations in Colorado, we will make sure that Coloradans know what liberal special-interest groups and their politicians are doing, and the impacts they’ll have on our state.”

A former pitcher at Valparaiso University and teacher in Aurora, Fields joined AFP after working as a policy aide for Republicans in the Colorado legislature and for Wyoming Republican Sen. Mike Enzi, as well as working on local, state and federal political campaigns.

ProgressNow Colorado executive director Ian Silverii was amused by his conservative competition, characterizing it as “Regress Later.”

He pivoted to the November election. It’s what political advocacy groups do.

“This Washington, D.C.-based organization is a front group to help Walker Stapleton continue to fall upwards in his so-far disastrous career,” Silverii said in response to Fields’ announcement. “All the out-of-state money in the world can’t cover up the fact that Stapleton is an absentee treasurer, a sloppy campaigner and a vocal Trump supporter who does not deserve the promotion he’s asking Coloradans for.”

Singer responded to Silverii’s take:

“We’re looking at races from the governor’s race, AG race, some congressional, and state house, state Senate and even watching the ballot initiatives and what liberal groups are doing in Colorado It isn’t about one candidate or one race, and we’re going to be around long after the 2018 election season.”

Click (HERE) for the link to see and/or download the 2018 Colorado Blue Book.

 

 

The Reagan Club meets on the second Thursday of every month at CB & Potts, 1257 W 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234 from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. with doors open at 6:00 p.m. Enter via CB & Potts main entrance and head to the back meeting room. Food and beverages are available from CB & Potts. We feature different programs and speakers as we honor the 40th President. The Reagan Club of Colorado seeks to promote the Constitution, smaller government, lower taxes, personal freedom, helping candidates, and educating the public about one of our greatest presidents, Ronald Wilson Reagan.

Recent Comments