Elections

Why the “National Public Vote” scheme is unconstitutional

Why the “National Public Vote” scheme is unconstitutional

This article first appeared in the Daily Caller.

The U.S. Supreme Court says each state legislature has “plenary” (complete) power to decide how its state’s presidential electors are chosen.

But suppose a state legislature decided to raise cash by selling its electors to the highest bidder. Do you think the Supreme Court would uphold such a measure?

If your answer is “no,” then you intuitively grasp a basic principle of constitutional law—one overlooked by those proposing the “National Popular Vote Compact” (NPV).

NPV is a plan to change how we elect our president. Under the plan, each state signs a compact to award all its electoral votes to the presidential candidate who wins the national popular vote. The compact comes into effect when states with a majority of presidential electors sign on.

In assessing the constitutionality of NPV, you have to consider some of its central features. First, NPV abandons the idea that presidential electors represent the people of their own states. Second, it discards an election system balanced among interests and values in favor of one recognizing only national popularity. That popularity need not be high: A state joining the NPV compact agrees to assign its electors to even the winner of a tiny plurality in a multi-candidate election.

Third, because NPV states would have a majority of votes in the Electoral College, NPV would effectively repeal the Constitution’s provision for run-off elections in the House of Representatives.

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Constitutional Topic: The Electoral College

The Constitutional Topics pages at the USConstitution.nett site are presented to delve deeper into topics than can be provided on the Glossary Page or in the FAQ pages. This Topic Page concerns the Electoral College. The Electoral College is embodied in the Constitution in Article 2, Section 1, and in the 12th Amendment.


The Framers were wary of giving the people the power to directly elect the President — some felt the citizenry too beholden to local interests, too easily duped by promises or shenanigans, or simply because a national election, in the time of oil lamps and quill pens, was just impractical. Some proposals gave the power to the Congress, but this did not sit well with those who wanted to see true separation of the branches of the new government. Still others felt the state legislatures should decide, but this was thought to make the President too beholden to state interests. The Electoral College, proposed by James Wilson, was the compromise that the Constitutional Convention reached.

Though the term is never used in the Constitution itself, the electors that choose the President at each election are traditionally called a College. In the context of the Constitution, the meaning of college is not that of a school, but of a group of people organized toward a common goal.

The Electoral College insulates the election of the President from the people by having the people elect not the person of the President, but the person of an Elector who is pledged to vote for a specific person for President. Though the ballot may read “John McCain” or “Barack Obama,” you’re really voting for “John Smith” who is a McCain supporter or “Jack Jones” who is an Obama supporter. Continue reading

Join the Reagan Club on March 14 to hear Steve House at the Reagan Club meeting at CB & Potts (1257 W 120th Ave, Westminster). Steve will be speaking on a number of topics ranging from where the party has been to what we might see with the upcoming organization meetings. We also look forward to hearing about his experiences in Kenya as part of a medical mission.
Check-in and networking begins at 6:00pm with Steve speaking after announcements at 7pm
Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members & $10 for non-members. You can also pay your 2019 dues. There is food and drink available for purchase from CB & Potts menu.

 

Will Democratic Primary Voters Tolerate a Liberal?

A former Colorado governor will test whether the Sandernistas have taken over the party.

By James Freeman

March 4, 2019 4:55 p.m. ET


Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper at a campaign house party in Manchester, N.H. last month. PHOTO: ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is claiming a socialist victory in the battle of ideas. Meanwhile former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is running for President and testing whether economic non-extremists can still win Democratic presidential primaries.

Sunday in Chicago, Mr. Sanders implied that people no longer view him as a Marxist kook. The Chicago Tribune reports on a Sanders speech at Navy Pier:

“Three years ago, they thought we were kind of crazy and extreme, not the case anymore,” he said. “We are not only going to defeat (President Donald) Trump, we are going to transform the United States of America.”

Mr. Sanders has certainly made extremism cool among Democratic presidential candidates. All of his fellow senators seeking the party’s nomination have joined him in co-sponsoring the Green New Deal and its promise of government health care and the end of traditional energy sources. They have also voted for an abortion policy so expansive that it allows adults to decide the fate of children even when they are no longer in the womb. Continue reading

We’ve searched the Bill of Rights but can’t find anything where healthcare is a “right” contrary to what several presidential candidates say. In case you forgot, the Supreme Court ruled Obamacare was a “tax” not a “right”

Who’s Deplorable Now?

Democrats wonder if they still need the Midwest.

By James Freeman
Feb. 25, 2019 5:08 p.m. ET

Election night at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016. PHOTO: SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES

It must be exhausting these days serving as a Democratic political operative. The party remains in a seemingly endless debate over how much to favor some demographic groups of American voters—and how much to punish others.

At one point there seemed to be a Democratic consensus that the party’s disappointing performance in 2016 had a lot to do with ignoring or deploring blue-collar voters in the Midwest. And at least some of the party’s current and potential 2020 presidential candidates still hold this view.

This week in the New York Times, Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns report from Iowa:
With polls indicating that electoral viability is as important to voters as any policy issue, a handful of the party’s prospects are already holding up their Midwestern credentials to make the case that they are the ones who can turn Big 10 country — Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin — blue again.

But the Timesmen add: Continue reading

Get ready to be engaged and informed with The Reagan Club of Colorado’s 2019 speakers at our monthly meetings.  We meet on the second Thursday of month from 6:00pm-8:30pm at CB & Potts, 1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.

Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  You can pay your 2019 dues at the door or online at: http://www.reaganclubco.com/membership-dues/

Be engaged and informed at our Thursday meeting.  Pinch hitting for our previously announce

d speaker, Patrick Neville, is former state senator Tim Neville.  Tim has graciously 

agreed to fill in for son Patrick who has a business matter to attend to.  Tim has been a welcome guest at Reagan Club before.  We look forward to Tim’s news and analysis. 

 

We know February 14 is on the calendar for other than the Reagan Club meeting — we’ll be marking that, too!

See you the 14th.

If you are planning to attend,  Continue reading

Bill to link Colo.’s presidential choice to national vote heading to Senate floor

  • Jan 24, 2019

JakeOlimb / iStock

A bill that would pledge all of Colorado’s nine electoral votes in presidential elections to the candidate who wins the national popular vote passed a state Senate committee Wednesday, sending it to the Senate floor for a vote.

Scores of professors, activists, lobbyists, and citizens filled the committee’s room, the nearby hallway, and a spillover room to hear the debate. Among them: newly elected Secretary of State Jena Griswold.

The bill is a partisan issue, some say, a rebuke of Donald Trump’s election in 2016. And many warned of unintended consequences, deepening fractures in an already-divided country. Continue reading

Effort launched to repeal Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights; possible ballot issue before the Title Board

The Title Board is the first step in putting a citizen-initiated question before voters.

TABOR is a constitutional amendment that was passed by voters in 1992 that requires voter approval to increase taxes or take on new debt.  It also limits the growth of a portion of the state budget to a formula of population growth plus inflation. It has been a controversial topic since its inception, and it’s been debated in the courts numerous times.

Many Democrats say it is a threat to Colorado’s education, transportation and health care funding, while Republicans counter that it is what has allowed the Colorado economy to prosper, as well as allowing Colorado to more easily weather economic downturns than states that lack taxpayer protections such as TABOR.

Many attempts to repeal or tweak portions of the amendment have come before the Title Board. This is the first time, however, that anyone can recall where a full repeal of the amendment has been proposed.

Continue reading

Get ready to be engaged and informed with The Reagan Club of Colorado’s 2019 speakers at our monthly meetings.  We meet on the second Thursday of month from 6:00pm-8:30pm at CB & Potts, 1257 W. 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234.  Admission is $5 for Reagan Club members and $10 for non-members.

Our 2019 annual dues are $30, $25 for 65+ years old seniors, $25 for elected officials, $15 for students under 21, and $55 for couples ($50 for senior couples).  You can pay your 2019 dues at the door or online at: http://www.reaganclubco.com/membership-dues/

Our January 10th speaker will be George Brauchler, the 18th Judicial District Attorney in Arapahoe County.

His highest profile case was prosecuting James Holmes, the 2012 Aurora theatre shooter who killed 12 people during the midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises.”  A Colorado judge formally sentences Holmes to 12 life sentences, one life term for each person he killed, plus 3,318 years in prison for the attempted murders of those he wounded and for rigging his apartment with explosives. He is not eligible for parole.

George Brauchler ran for Colorado Attorney General but lost to Phil Weiser in November, 2018.  He will be discussing what happened during the election and where do we go from there.  You don’t want to miss our 2019 kick-off meeting and there will be time for Q&A.

Food and beverages are not included with your admission but available for purchase. CB & Potts Westminster’s menu can be viewed at  https://www.cbpotts.com/locations/westminster.php

  • 6:00pm Doors open, networking, food & drink orders
  • 6:30pm Pledge, Prayer, welcome, & announcements
  • 7:00pm Featured speaker followed by Q&A
  • 8:15-8:30pm Closing remarks

You can find out more up-to-date details at http://www.reaganclubco.com/  and on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ReaganClub

 

The Reagan Club meets on the second Thursday of every month at CB & Potts, 1257 W 120th Avenue, Westminster, CO, 80234 from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. with doors open at 6:00 p.m. Enter via CB & Potts main entrance and head to the back meeting room. Food and beverages are available from CB & Potts. We feature different programs and speakers as we honor the 40th President. The Reagan Club of Colorado seeks to promote the Constitution, smaller government, lower taxes, personal freedom, helping candidates, and educating the public about one of our greatest presidents, Ronald Wilson Reagan.

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